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[personal profile] muninnhuginn Mon 2017-06-26 22:13
When your mother told you to fold your clothes,...

She didn't mean like this:
Cargigan folded into skull

(Don't ask how the socks turned out!)
[location |at my desk]
[Current Music: |earworm: Sad-eyed Lady of the Lowlands]

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[personal profile] xiphmont Mon 2017-06-26 17:08
OPPP: the Laser Fist of Heaven

Given the two laser control panels and the design comparison, what's the actual goal here?

The first goal is functional: I need to add a number of new control and status functions.

Second: I am a vain man, and I want this tool to look a little less hokey. Not entirely, just a little. I mean, I gotta be me.

The biggest addition will be a software control for the laser. I somewhat arbitrarily decided to go with a rebranded Anywells controller from LightObject-- I'll find out later if that was a good idea or not.

The huge, spread-out, not-calibrated-to-anything digital PWM laser current control gets replaced by a thumbwheel implementing a Kelvin ladder. And instead of a 7-segment LED display that simply goes from 0-100, I'll use a good-old analog meter that measures actual milliampres.

While we're at it, a matching analog meter reads cooling water temperature.

Like on the American control panel, the key switch is the only power on-off, and the emergency stop will be a real immediate-stop interlock.

I have an onboard air assist, so that needs a switch too, along with a lighting switch and two switched laser pointers, one a centering beam and another for focus.

And, why not steal the tube runtime meter from the nifty panel as well? :-)

Last of all, arrange it in a more 'American' style: functions grouped together, consistent labeling, and no angry color salad. And just one or two inside jokes, because the tool is still a bit hokey.

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[personal profile] supergee Mon 2017-06-26 16:56
Enemies of America

Radley Balko says, We should treat Confederate monuments the way Moscow and Budapest have treated communist statues. They want me to bend over and turn off my ad block  )

[xpost |http://supergee.livejournal.com/4186497.html]

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[personal profile] supergee Mon 2017-06-26 16:47
Archetypes & Architecture

The corner of Lovecraft & Ballard
[xpost |http://supergee.livejournal.com/4186260.html]

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[personal profile] happydork Mon 2017-06-26 21:42
Chicago Dyke March’s antisemitism

Some thoughts about the Chicago Dyke March’s antisemitism.


Cut because not everyone has the cope for this - and that is super legit )

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[personal profile] purplecat Mon 2017-06-26 21:23
Denial on Tour 2017

We were supposed to be going to Bristol Comic Con but they cancelled the con. So instead we were let loose on the unsuspecting Bristol countryside.





More pictures under the cut )
[xpost |http://louisedennis.livejournal.com/396829.html]

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[personal profile] conuly Mon 2017-06-26 16:26
Just finished the recent Bad Penny book

Two thoughts:

1. The author must have had "agouti" come up in his word-a-day calendar
2. Holy shit that ending. That just came the fuck out of nowhere.

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[personal profile] wychwood Mon 2017-06-26 21:23
may booklog: i will catch up if it kills me

55. The Interior Life, Dorothy J Heydt - DON'T JUDGE



56. The House of Shattered Wings - Aliette de Bodard ) Ultimately too dark for me, and for the plot to work for me, but I'm not giving up on de Bodard. This series, maybe.


57. The Young Stepmother and 59. The Carbonels - Charlotte M Yonge ) The Carbonels is not great, but The Young Stepmother is solid (for values of Charlotte Yonge).


58. Mortal Engines - Philip Reeve ) I've read worse; SFF-minded children might enjoy it, and there's definitely worse out there.


60. A Closed and Common Orbit - Becky Chambers ) Like the first one; entertaining, sometimes interesting, would probably read more, but I was not blown away.


61. The Art of Deception - Nora Roberts ) An acceptable-enough Harlequin, if you can get past the standard "consent is UNMANLY" elements.


62. Green Rider - Kristen Britain ) A solid fantasy - I want to read the rest of the series, now.


63. Too Like the Lightning - Ada Palmer ) A nasty unpleasant piece of work, with some potentially interesting ideas and worldbuilding that couldn't sustain my enjoyment in the face of the rest of it.


64. All the Birds in the Sky - Charlie Jane Anders ) Ultimately a bit unmemorable, although I enjoyed it well enough in the reading.


65. Words are My Matter - Ursula Le Guin ) Somewhat insubstantial, unfortunately.


66. The Geek Feminist Revolution - Kameron Hurley ) A much better collection - I like Hurley's nonfic much more than her novels!


67. Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet - Ta-Nehisi Coates and Brian Stelfreeze ) Definitely not your typical superhero comic, even your typical thoughtful superhero comic; I'm interested to see where they take this.


Four Mantlemass books - Barbara Willard ) Classic English children's books, and still well worth reading. I should make sure I get hold of the others.
[Current Mood: | chipper]

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[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll Mon 2017-06-26 15:45
One bonus of packing up thousands of books

I finally found out where I misshelved this.

(no idea what review series I can fit it into)


[xpost |http://james-nicoll.livejournal.com/5934500.html]

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[personal profile] lunabee34 Mon 2017-06-26 15:15
Perfume Reviews + Swaps/Giveaways

Michael by Michael Kors

Top notes are freesia, incense, chinese osmanthus and tamarind; middle notes are tuberose, iris, peony, orris root and arum lily; base notes are musk, cashmere wood and vetiver.

This is a very sweet white floral. The tuberose is almost a gardenia dupe. Josh cried almost instant headache, so I didn't leave it on long enough for the dry down, but I could just start to smell the woodiness of the iris start to tamp down the florals before I scrubbed it.

Clean (the original)

This soap-inspired scent combines litsea cubeba, orange, sweet lime, pink grapefruit, passion lily, rose geranium, and white musk and is perfect for women who enjoy crisp, subtly. It opens with a bright burst of freshness and dries down to a simply CLEAN scent.

This does smell fresh and clean. Very bright and citrusy but very sweet (must be the sweet lime). I don't get any orange or grapefruit, but I do smell rose geranium (yummy) and soap. Clean is a good descriptor. I would like to smell this on someone else, but it's not for me. I passed it to a friend.

BPAL Rapunzel

Angel’s trumpet, bois de rose, orris, and wild lettuce.

I really like this. It smells green and sweet and a little of rose. Josh detects a note of ginger. It's a keeper!

SWAPS AND GIVEAWAYS )

[xpost |http://lunabee34.livejournal.com/521683.html]

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[syndicated profile] languagelog_feed Mon 2017-06-26 18:36
"… misdemeanor of the 115th Congress.”

Posted by Mark Liberman

David Crisp, "Gianforte: Congress’ newest misdemeanor", Last Best News 6/25/2017:

In case you were wondering whether Greg Gianforte will ever live down his body slam of a reporter for the Guardian, here’s a clue.

The Associated Press reported last week that Gianforte drew boos from the Republican side of the aisle during his brief speech following his swearing in as Montana’s representative in the U.S. House. The murmurs apparently had nothing to do with misdemeanor assault but came in response to Gianforte’s call to “drain the swamp” and for a bill denying pay to members of Congress if they fail to balance the budget.

But what’s really interesting is the C-SPAN transcript of Gianforte’s swearing in. The transcripts, according to a FAQ at the C-SPAN website, are drawn from the closed captioning that scrolls on the screen during sessions of Congress. The transcripts are included on the website to help visitors find the video they want, not to provide an accurate record of the actual speeches.

But they can nevertheless be revealing. On the tape, House Speaker Paul Ryan swears in Gianforte, then says, “Congratulations, you are now a member of the 115th Congress.” On the transcript, Ryan says, “Congratulations, you are now misdemeanor of the 115th Congress.”

Here's the audio:

And here's a screenshot of the relevant segment of the captioning, which actually says "CONGRATULATIONS, ARE YOU NOW MISDEMEANOR OF THE 115TH CONGRESS":

 

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[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll Mon 2017-06-26 15:20
Dumb Calibre/Kobo question

I can see my Kobo has about 300 more titles on it than my laptop Calibre does (because I got the Kobo well before the laptop). How do I move the titles that are on the Kobo to Calibre?
[xpost |http://james-nicoll.livejournal.com/5934302.html]

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[personal profile] ffutures Mon 2017-06-26 20:16
RIP Stewart Wieck

I forgot to mention that Stewart Wieck, another big name in gaming, died last week. He only 49 when he died - apparently he just collapsed suddenly after a fencing match. Most notable as one of the founders of White Wolf and a major writer for the World of Darkness books.

http://www.tenkarstavern.com/2017/06/stewart-wieck-has-passed-white-wolf.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stewart_Wieck

https://www.rpg.net/columns/advanced-designers-and-dragons/advanced-designers-and-dragons14.phtml

[xpost |http://ffutures.livejournal.com/1280210.html]

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[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll Mon 2017-06-26 15:09
Thanks to all the people who have sent money or supported my Patreon

One issue: I really suck at giving people their free reviews. Would appreciate pointers on how to suck less.
[xpost |http://james-nicoll.livejournal.com/5933910.html]

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[personal profile] flick Sun 2017-06-25 17:42
The sweetpeas are taking over

Last year, I planted a couple of perennial sweetpea plants in one of the flower beds. They did ok, but weren't really anything special.

Either they needed a little while to get themselves established or they much prefer the weather this year:



I had a go at putting normal sweetpeas along the drive this year, as I had spares and thought they'd look nice if they grew up the fence. They've rather been out-competed by the stuff on the other side of the fence (in the stableyard), though. I think I might get myself another pack of perennial seeds and see how they do there!

We went to see a horse on Sunday: he seemed to have a lovely personality, and looked nicely put together, but he'd never been ridden properly and didn't have a clue what he was doing in the school. Hopefully she'll find him a nice home where he can do nothing but go for long hacks....

I went to London last week, to see the dentist. Some sort of viral thing seems to have come back with me, which explains why I was so knackered all weekend, and probably also the upset stomach. I'm not exactly *ill*, but I'm also not entirely well. Possibly, in the light of this, I should have spent less time weeding today. It did need doing, though: it's been too hot recently to contemplate working in the garden.

We seem to have a lot of what look almost like yellow thistles appearing in the garden this year. Not sure what they are or where they've suddenly appeared from!

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[syndicated profile] bruce_schneier_feed Mon 2017-06-26 17:30
Separating the Paranoid from the Hacked

Posted by Bruce Schneier

Sad story of someone whose computer became owned by a griefer:

The trouble began last year when he noticed strange things happening: files went missing from his computer; his Facebook picture was changed; and texts from his daughter didn't reach him or arrived changed.

"Nobody believed me," says Gary. "My wife and my brother thought I had lost my mind. They scheduled an appointment with a psychiatrist for me."

But he built up a body of evidence and called in a professional cybersecurity firm. It found that his email addresses had been compromised, his phone records hacked and altered, and an entire virtual internet interface created.

"All my communications were going through a man-in-the-middle unauthorised server," he explains.

It's the "psychiatrist" quote that got me. I regularly get e-mails from people explaining in graphic detail how their whole lives have been hacked. Most of them are just paranoid. But a few of them are probably legitimate. And I have no way of telling them apart.

This problem isn't going away. As computers permeate even more aspects of our lives, it's going to get even more debilitating. And we don't have any way, other than hiring a "professional cybersecurity firm," of telling the paranoids from the victims.

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[syndicated profile] tim_harford_feed Mon 2017-06-26 16:45
Books about calling statistical bullshit

Posted by Tim Harford

Other Writing

A friend recently emailed to ask me for books that might help navigate a world full of statistical bullshit. Here are some recommendations.

I can’t think of a better science writer than Ben Goldacre, who burns with righteous mischief. His Bad Science (UK) (US) isn’t always about statistics, but it’s excellent throughout and an essential read for anyone who wants to understand some of the faults of modern health and nutrition journalism. Wonderful book.

Of course you should subscribe to the More or Less podcast, but you could also enjoy The Tiger That Isn’t (UK) (US). This is the unofficial book of the series, written by More or Less founders Andrew Dilnot and Michael Blastland. A highly readable guide to making sense of numbers in the wild.

Also very good – with more US examples – is Stat-Spotting (UK) (US) by Joel Best. Best’s book has given me some of my favourite examples of bad stats, but it currently seems a bit overpriced on Amazon, alas.

The classic of the field is, of course, Darrell Huff’s How To Lie With Statistics (UK) (US). There’s a sad coda that will tarnish your view of Huff; but this is still a terrific book.

Brand new book by the very splendid Evan Davis is called Post Truth (UK) (US) – haven’t yet read much but looks good.

And finally try Naked Statistics (UK) (US) by Charles Wheelan, who with wit and clarity wrote the similarly excellent Naked Economics (UK) (US).

Best, Dilnot, Huff and Wheelan all cover quite similar ground. If I was picking just one of them I’d go for Dilnot for a UK audience and Wheelan in the US.

My new book is “Fifty Things That Made The Modern Economy” – coming very, very soon and available for pre-order. Grab yourself a copy in the US (slightly different title) or in the UK or through your local bookshop.

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[syndicated profile] thebloggess_feed Mon 2017-06-26 17:08
Tell me where to go. Literally.

Posted by thebloggess

Once a year we try to go on a family vacation and this year is no different, except that it is because I’m still not completely recovered from whatever vampire curse I’ve contracted and my arthritis might be worse soon … Continue reading
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[personal profile] muccamukk Mon 2017-06-26 10:14
Murderbot and Gender

One of the things I liked about Martha Wells' Murderbot Diaries series is that the title character is some sort of android/human clone hybrid and has neither a sexuality nor a gender. The books are written in first person, but all the outside characters refer to the Murderbot as "it," and frankly it's fine with that. Wells mentioned on a recent AMA: "I feel the core of the character is that while Murderbot is obviously a person, it isn't human and doesn't want to be human, so while other characters might give it pronouns, it's not going to want to pick any for itself."

I know at least one person who found the use of "it" over "they" for non-gendered pronouns uncomfortable, while Nenya liked it for reminding the reader of the profoundly non human nature of the SecUnit. Reading reviews, I noticed that people used a variety of approaches to deal with Murderbot's gender, and I did a quick tally of them.

214 Reviews on Goodreads as of this writing

  • 137 of them don't use pronouns for Murderbot (a few seemed to be deliberately avoiding doing so, but mostly these reviews just said something like "Good book, will read the next one.")

  • 5 of them are in a language I don't speak (I'm taking a Murderbot approach to this, and half-assing my research)

  • 44 (61%) of them used "it"

  • 12 (17%) of them used "he"

  • 8 (11%) of them used "they"

  • 8 (11%) of them used "she" (Ann Leckie's got them trained!)

Speaking of Leckie, she has recced this series as well. I feel like Murderbot and Breq could have a profitable conversation, really.
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[syndicated profile] textsfromwm_redux_feed Mon 2017-06-26 08:01
Photo



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